Under appropriate circumstances, post-divorce spousal support may last much longer than the marriage itself. So held the Appellate Division, Second Department, in its September 2019 decision in Murphy v. Murphy.

The parties were married in 2004. They had no children together. Prior to the marriage, the wife was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis.

In 2013, after 8½ years of marriage, the wife commenced this action for a divorce. After three years, the parties were able to enter a stipulation resolving the issue of equitable distribution. The issue of maintenance was tried before Supreme Court, Suffolk County Justice Carol MacKenzie. At the time of trial, the wife was 42 years old and the husband 47.

The critical issue presented was whether the wife was capable of working, and if so, in what capacity, as a result of the symptoms that she alleged she experienced due to multiple sclerosis. Justice MacKenzie concluded that the wife was incapable of maintaining employment. The wife was awarded maintenance of $10,760 per month terminating 25 years after trial when the wife turned 67 years old.


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Two of three November 5, 2014 custody decisions of the Appellate Division, Second Department, reversed Family Court determinations.

In the only affirmance in Mondschein v. Mondschein, the Second Department upheld the order of Westchester County Family Court Judge David Klein which, after a hearing, granted a father’s petition to modify the custody provisions of the parties’ divorce (2011) stipulation of settlement, awarding the father sole legal and physical custody of the parties’ two younger children, with supervised visitation to the mother. Affirming Judge Klein, the Second Department noted:

Since custody determinations necessarily depend to a great extent upon an assessment of the character and credibility of the parties and witnesses, deference is accorded the Family Court’s findings. Therefore, its findings should not be set aside unless they lack a sound and substantial basis in the record.

Here, contrary to the mother’s contention, the appellate court found that Judge Klein had properly considered the totality of the circumstances, and that the record supported his determination that there had been a sufficient change in circumstances requiring a change in custody to protect the best interests of the parties’ two younger children. That record included the hearing testimony and the recommendation of the court-appointed forensic evaluator.

In Burke v. Cogan, the Second Department reversed the determination of Suffolk County Family Court Judge Martha Luft that had dismissed the petition of a mother to modify a prior custody order by awarding her sole residential custody of the parties’ 13 year-old child. The appellate court awarded the mother such custody.


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The husband’s willingness to lie was only exceeded by his arrogance, which apparently permits him to believe that the court might possibly buy the bridge he is selling. The world in which Mr. Medina lives, is at best in a parallel universe.

So noted Justice Charles D. Wood, Supervising Judge of the Matrimonial Part of the Westchester County Supreme Court, in his December 17, 2013 decision in Medina v. Medina, when awarding the wife $53,000 of the $63,000 in counsel fees she incurred in this divorce action.

The parties were married in 2001. They had one child, now five years old. Both parties were 38 years old. The wife attained the equivalent of a bachelor’s degree in Poland. During the marriage, she earned her real estate license. For the last two years, she had worked selling real estate directly for a developer. After having worked in a sales position for another developer for six years, the wife gave birth in 2008 to the parties’ son, and only worked half the year. She also stayed home with the child in 2009. In 2011, she earned $87,000, and in 2010, $58,936.

Prior to the marriage, the husband held licenses to sell insurance, securities, and a Series 7 certification. The day before the January, 2011 commencement of this divorce action, the husband was laid off as an investment advisor with the firm for whom he had been working since 2006. In 2011, the husband worked for a securities firm, and earned $87,911.47. He now works for another securities firm, where his income is based solely on commissions.

A six-day trial was conducted on the issues of parental access, equitable distribution, allocation of marital debt and tax arrears, child support and maintenance (and arrears of both). Following a decision on these issues, a hearing was held on the wife’s application for counsel fees.

The wife had incurred counsel fees of over $63,000,based upon her counsel’s fee at $400 per hour. Of that sum, the wife had already paid $25,000.


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