It Need Not Be Rocket Science
It Need Not Be Rocket Science

A business, professional practice, or (until recent statutory amendments) license may be valued as a asset for divorce purposes based upon the amount of income it generates for the owner/holder. That asset may then be equitably distributed by granting the non-owner a monetary award equal to some percentage of the value.

Double-dipping, or double-counting, is the term for using the same stream of income both to value the business/practice, and then, after distributing an award to the non-owner based on the asset’s value, using the stream of income generated by the business/practice to base an award of spousal support (or child support, for that matter). If the non-owner spouse receives a “piece” of the income stream as an asset award, should the spouse get another piece as spousal support (maintenance)?

The “law” is yes, no and maybe. There is a rule against double-dipping, except when there’s not.

For the most part, if the business/practice is recognized as a “tangible asset,” just as the court would characterize a piece of real property, or publicly-traded stock, or a privately-held company whose income is a result of the work of many people, then it is generally held that the rule against double-dipping does not apply. The non-owner would get a distributive award based on the asset. Maintenance may also be awarded based upon the income generated by the tangible asset business. The rule against double-dipping rule does not apply.

If however, the business value is recognized as an “intangible asset,” then the rule against double-dipping applies, and the same stream of income may not be twice used.


Continue Reading

A professional practice is an asset which may be valued and equitably distributed in a divorce. Generally, that value is a function of the income generated by the practice after deducting reasonable compensation being paid to the professional. However, once valued, the income attributable to ownership of the practice may not also be the basis on which to award spousal maintenance.

Take the September 10, 2015 decision of the Appellate Division, Third Department, in Mula v. Mula. There, after 42 years of marriage, the husband commenced this action for a divorce. The wife counterclaimed for divorce and, by agreement, the parties were awarded mutual divorces on the grounds of irretrievable breakdown. During the marriage, the husband earned his C.P.A. license in 1981 and became the sole proprietor of an accounting practice in 1997. During the course of the marriage, the wife was primarily involved with the upkeep of the parties’ home and raising their three children.

Among other rulings, Ulster County Supreme Court Justice Anthony McGinty awarded the wife durational maintenance of $1,500 per month.

On appeal, the Third Department reduced this award to $1,000 per month, holding that Justice McGinty had double-counted the value of the husband’s professional practice. The lower court had valued the income generated by the practice as an asset and equitably distributed that asst. However, Justice McGinty also deemed the husband’s income to include the entire income generated by the practice when calculating the maintenance award to the wife.

The accounting practice was valued at $255,000. Apparently, the husband’s C.P.A. license was separately valued at $39,000.The husband contended on appeal that Justice McGinty had erred when calculating maintenance by failing to reduce his available income to reflect the court’s distributive award of his professional practice and license.

At issue is the rule against double counting, which provides that once a court converts a specific stream of income into an asset, that income may no longer be calculated into the maintenance formula and payout.

The husband’s solely-owned accounting firm was a service business for purposes of this rule.


Continue Reading