Lying childIn his February, 2016 TED talk, developmental researcher Kang Lee tells us that adults cannot tell whether children are lying.

As part of his research, Dr. Lee asked children to guess the numbers on two face-down cards. The children were told that if could do that, they would get a big prize. In the middle of the game with a child, the monitor leaves the room, telling the child not to peek at the cards. Hidden cameras record the actions.

More than 90 percent of children will peek as soon as the proctor leaves the room. The more important question for Dr. Lee was when the proctor returned, would the child confess or lie about cheating? By age 4 and up, at least 80% of the children lie.

However, Dr. Lee also wanted to know if we, adults, can tell when a child is lying or telling the truth. Dr. Lee played videos of these types of games for many, many adults from all walks of life. In half of the videos, the children lied. In the other half of the videos, the children told the truth. Recognizing that if the adults guessed randomly, there would be a 50% chance of them being right, an adult whose accuracy was around 50% was a terrible detector of children’s lies.

Spoiler Alert (although the title of this blog post gives it away): Please watch the video before proceeding.


Continue Reading If The Pros Can't Tell When Children Lie, How Can Courts Decide Custody?

The husband’s willingness to lie was only exceeded by his arrogance, which apparently permits him to believe that the court might possibly buy the bridge he is selling. The world in which Mr. Medina lives, is at best in a parallel universe.

So noted Justice Charles D. Wood, Supervising Judge of the Matrimonial Part of the Westchester County Supreme Court, in his December 17, 2013 decision in Medina v. Medina, when awarding the wife $53,000 of the $63,000 in counsel fees she incurred in this divorce action.

The parties were married in 2001. They had one child, now five years old. Both parties were 38 years old. The wife attained the equivalent of a bachelor’s degree in Poland. During the marriage, she earned her real estate license. For the last two years, she had worked selling real estate directly for a developer. After having worked in a sales position for another developer for six years, the wife gave birth in 2008 to the parties’ son, and only worked half the year. She also stayed home with the child in 2009. In 2011, she earned $87,000, and in 2010, $58,936.

Prior to the marriage, the husband held licenses to sell insurance, securities, and a Series 7 certification. The day before the January, 2011 commencement of this divorce action, the husband was laid off as an investment advisor with the firm for whom he had been working since 2006. In 2011, the husband worked for a securities firm, and earned $87,911.47. He now works for another securities firm, where his income is based solely on commissions.

A six-day trial was conducted on the issues of parental access, equitable distribution, allocation of marital debt and tax arrears, child support and maintenance (and arrears of both). Following a decision on these issues, a hearing was held on the wife’s application for counsel fees.

The wife had incurred counsel fees of over $63,000,based upon her counsel’s fee at $400 per hour. Of that sum, the wife had already paid $25,000.

Continue Reading Counsel Fees Awarded Against Husband Living in “Parallel Universe”