It Need Not Be Rocket Science
It Need Not Be Rocket Science

A business, professional practice, or (until recent statutory amendments) license may be valued as a asset for divorce purposes based upon the amount of income it generates for the owner/holder. That asset may then be equitably distributed by granting the non-owner a monetary award equal to some percentage of the value.

Double-dipping, or double-counting, is the term for using the same stream of income both to value the business/practice, and then, after distributing an award to the non-owner based on the asset’s value, using the stream of income generated by the business/practice to base an award of spousal support (or child support, for that matter). If the non-owner spouse receives a “piece” of the income stream as an asset award, should the spouse get another piece as spousal support (maintenance)?

The “law” is yes, no and maybe. There is a rule against double-dipping, except when there’s not.

For the most part, if the business/practice is recognized as a “tangible asset,” just as the court would characterize a piece of real property, or publicly-traded stock, or a privately-held company whose income is a result of the work of many people, then it is generally held that the rule against double-dipping does not apply. The non-owner would get a distributive award based on the asset. Maintenance may also be awarded based upon the income generated by the tangible asset business. The rule against double-dipping rule does not apply.

If however, the business value is recognized as an “intangible asset,” then the rule against double-dipping applies, and the same stream of income may not be twice used.


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