Tom Griffiths, psychologist, cognitive scientist and Princeton professor, concludes his TED talk, 3 ways to make better decisions — by thinking like a computer, with the following lesson:

“You can’t control outcomes, just processes; and as long as you’ve used the best process, you’ve done the best that you can.”

Dr. Griffiths has researched the connections between natural and artificial intelligence to discover how people solve the challenging problems they encounter in everyday life. His 2016 book authored with Brian Christian, Algorithms to Live By, illustrates how the algorithms used by computers can inform human decision-making (and vice versa). The book was named one of the Amazon.com “Best Science Books of 2016” and appeared on Forbes’s “Must-read brain books of 2016” list as well as the MIT Technology Review’s “Best books of 2016” list.

In New York, most couples going through a divorce, although aware of litigation and mediation, do not know that they have a choice of a third structured process to unravel the marital relationship and transition the family through the divorce. Most divorcing couples don’t know that they have a chance to apply Griffiths’ lesson and select a process that can reduce the time, cost, anguish and damage that so often accompanies divorce litigation, yet address the shortcomings of mediation.

Continue Reading Divorcing Couples Can Learn a Lesson From Computer Algorithms

Jerilyn Klein Bier writes “How Advisors Help HNW [High Net Worth] Clients ‘Collaborate’ On Divorce” in the current issue of Financial Advisor, a monthly publication for financial planners, registered investment advisors and independent broker-dealers, She begins with a quote from Danny DeVito, portraying a divorce attorney in The War of the Roses, “When a couple starts keeping score, there is no winning, it’s only degrees of losing.”

Wealth managers “are having more success getting clients to settle their affairs amicably through collaborative divorces that enable splitting spouses to retain more of their wealth for themselves, their kids and their charities. Retaining wealth is particularly important for couples divorcing later in life with significant assets because there’s less time to rebuild wealth and finances before retirement.”

Ms. Bier reports that mediation and Collaborative Divorce are better divorce forums than the courts, providing the family the opportunity for holistic planning and a variety of flexible financial solutions to maintain family wealth.

She tells of Kim Kenawell-Hoffecker, a Pennsylvania Certified Divorce Financial Analyst (CDFA), who works several ways on collaborative divorces. She serves as a financial neutral on collaborative divorce teams for couples who are not clients. Ms. Kenawell-Hoffecker also takes on divorcing or divorced clients to manage their wealth.

But never both. The rules of the Collaborative Process assure the couple that financial and mental health experts will be neutral, in part, by prohibiting the expert from taking on a spouse as a client following the divorce. The Process demands there be no incentive for a neutral expert to favor one side.

Conversely, financial advisors and therapists who represent one or both spouses can be confident referring their clients to the Collaborative Process, because the experts retained to be neutral during the divorce will not “steal” their clients after the divorce.

Ms. Kenawell-Hoffecker also reminds dueling spouses that with the hourly rates being charged for legal fees, that it is easy to quickly blow past the cost of the actual assets the couple is fighting over. Additionally, “the divorce is a tough enough decision to come to,” she says, “without adding salt to the wound.”

A Collaborative Divorce can avoid that, while expanding available solutions to maximize the goals of the couple.